Best Book I Have Not Read

Writing, Reading, Teaching, Life, Attempting to Balance it All

Poetry UOS grade 4 Writing Lesson 1 March 29, 2010

Filed under: Poetry,units of study,writing workshop — bestbookihavenotread @ 5:44 pm
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Writing Lesson 1: Using Notebook Entries to Inspire Poems

Materials

Overheads and/or student copies of “Figure 10-8A. Belinda’s notebook entry” and “Figure 10-8B. Belinda’s first draft (The No-Nonsense Guide to Teaching Writing by Davis & Hill)

Intended Learning

• Students use entries in their writing notebooks as seeds for writing poems, so they can expand on topics interesting to them or consider them in new ways.

Standards (Benchmarks)

  • Write responses to literature that summarize main ideas and significant details and support interpretations with references to the text.
  • Use full range of strategies to comprehend a variety of texts, such as nonfiction, poems, and stories.
  • Generate writing ideas through discussions with others and from printed materials.
  • Plan, draft, revise, and edit writing.
  • Produce informal writings (e.g., messages, journals, notes, and poems) for various purposes.

Big Ideas

• Use techniques to craft poetry, including line breaks, literary language, and imagery.

• Select language carefully to create images, mood, and impressions.

• Develop awareness of sounds of words and rhythm of phrases.

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Tell students they can use entries from their writing notebooks to write poems. Today they create poetry from previous entries.

Teaching

Tell students rereading previously written notebook entries can provide inspiration for writing poems. Sometimes a topic, a line, or a description can give them ideas for writing poems.

Show students “Figure 10-8A. Belinda’s notebook entry,” page 162. Read the entry to students. Show them “Figure 10-8B. Belinda’s first draft,” page 162. Read the poem aloud.

Facilitate a discussion with students about how Belinda used her notebook entry to inspire a poem. Point out words or phrases she lifted from her notebook entry and included in the poem as well as how she rephrased ideas and feelings.

Active Engagement

Ask students to work with partners to look through their notebooks to find entries they could use to inspire poems. Students might want to circle words or phrases they might use in their poems.

Link

Have students continue the work they started with their partners. After searching through entries, students should try to write poems inspired by these entries. Encourage students to experiment with writing poetry just for the fun of it.

Independent and Small Group Time

• Students write poetry independently in their writing notebooks.

• Confers individually or with small groups.

Sharing/Closure

• Two or three students share their poems or pieces of poems and tell why they chose these entries as inspiration

Notes:

At the end of this unit, students revise and edit three to five poems to publish in take-home books.

 

Fifth Grade Poetry Unit of Study Writing Lesson 1

Filed under: Poetry,units of study,writing workshop — bestbookihavenotread @ 7:38 am
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Writing Lesson 1: Using the Writing Notebook-Collecting Interesting Words

Materials

• Poetry exemplars and anthologies used during Reading Workshop

• Students’ writing notebooks

• Teacher’s writing notebook

Intended Learning

• Students use poetry mentor texts and the world around them to record interesting and engaging words in their writing notebooks to develop a clearer sense of what it means to read and write like poets.

Big Ideas

• Develop awareness of sounds of words and rhythm of phrases.

Mini-Lesson

In her book, Poemcrazy, Susan Goldsmith Wooldridge stresses the importance of collecting words. She is always collecting words (“they’re free”) and writing them in her notebook.

Connection

Explain to students they are surrounded by words, good words, all the time. But unless we slow down and notice, we often miss them. Remind students that, in Reading Workshop, they have begun to notice the way poets use words and phrases to create imagery and emotion. The exercise today will help them as they begin to write poems.

Teaching

Tell students they are about to go on a word hunt. Their job is to look around the room and find interesting, engaging, intriguing words, or words they just like, and write them in their notebooks.

Model by reading three or four words recorded in your own notebook, such as “Yo!,” “wondrous,” “swiped,” or “pling.” Say each word slowly to “savor” the words’ sounds.

Ask students to look around the room for words they can see from their seats, on labels, posters, book covers, posted poems, and so on. Circulate around the room noticing students’ progress.

After a minute or two, ask a few students to share out. Again, enjoy the words’ rhythm and music.

Active Engagement

Give students three or four minutes to move around the room, looking for words and listening to the rhythmic or unique sounds of the words.

Tell students they are to write seven to 10 more words in their writing notebooks. Remind students they do not have to worry about the words’ meaning right now; they just need to pay attention to sounds, rhythms, and music of the words.

When students return to the group, have a few share out one or two of their interesting words. Choose students whose words reflect a variety of word choices, including nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, onomatopoeias, and so on.

Tell students today during independent writing time, they browse through some poems and poetry anthologies on their tables to find more words to add to lists in their writing notebooks. Students may already have poems in their book bags, depending on whether they have done the Reading Workshop Lesson 1: Poetry Pass -An Interview With Poetry .

Independent and Small Group Time

Students work independently or with partners to list possible words.

Sharing/Closure

• Students share with partners some words they found and wrote in their notebooks.

• Several students share out one or two of their favorites with the whole group.

• Close Writing Workshop by rereading one or two mentor poems, savoring—but not discussing—the language.

 

Fifth Grade Poetry UOS materials list March 28, 2010

Filed under: Poetry,units of study,writing workshop — bestbookihavenotread @ 7:25 pm
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  • Materials
  • Student copies of two poems, such as “Packing,” page 43, and “The Photo-graph,” page 19, in My Name Is Jorge: On Both Sides of the River by Jane Medina or other poems of your choice
  • Large variety of poetry books at different reading levels
  • Overhead and student copies of teacher-selected poem with strong concrete imagery, such as “Weeding With Dad,” page 52, in Baseball, Snakes, and Summer Squash by Donald Graves or “The Photograph,” page 19, in My Name Is Jorge: On Both Sides of the River by Jane Medina
  • Overhead and student copies of “Crafting Images” graphic organizer
  • Overhead and student copies of “October Saturday” from Lesson 12
  • More poems reflecting strong emotional element, such as “The Accident,” page 66, and “Giggling in Church,” page 70, in Baseball, Snakes, and Summer Squash: Poems About Growing Up by Donald Graves, “Rags” p. 13
  • Student copies of “Poetry Reflection” worksheet from The No-Nonsense Guide to Teaching Writing, pages 227-228, by Judy Davis and Sharon Hill, or your own reflection form (see end of this lesson)
  • pp. 159-160 The No-Nonsense Guide to Teaching Writing
  • Lesson D-8, “Using White Space in a Poem” from Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Overhead and student copies of notebook entries from Lesson D-8, “Using White Space in a Poem,” Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Lesson I-2, “Create a Poem from a Story,” from Teaching the Qualities of Writing by JoAnn Portalupi and Ralph Fletcher
  • I-3, L-6 from Teaching the Qualities of Writing by JoAnn Portalupi and Ralph Fletcher
  • Lesson D-14, “Use a Double Focus in a Poem,” from Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Student copies of “Grandpa’s Shoes,” from Lesson D-14, “Use a Double Focus in a Poem,” Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Lesson P–17, “Use Fragments When You Write a Poem,” from Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Student copies of “Hockey Practice at 5 a.m.” from Lesson P–17, “Use Fragments When You Write a Poem,” Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Chart paper for shared writing poem
  • Source lesson: “Six-Room-Poem” from Awakening the Heart by Georgia Heard
  • Resource: Regie Routman’s Kids Poems
  • Mentor poems about personal experiences or mentor poets who have written about personal experiences or important things in their lives, such as “Autumn Thoughts” or “Aunt Sue’s Stories” in The Dream Keeper and Other Poems by Langston Hughes; or “Weeding With Dad,” page 52, or “Faking It,” page 75, in Baseball, Snakes, and Summer Squash: Poems About Growing Up by Donald Graves
  • Overhead of teacher-created poem about interesting or important topic
  • Chart paper to create “Where Poets Get Their Ideas” chart
 

TCRWP Fall Reunion October 19, 2009

The Teachers College Reading and Writing Project


presents the

Saturday Reunion

October 24, 2009

9:00 am – 3:00 pm

Join the entire Project Community as we open our doors to thousands of educators from New York City and around the world for more than 140 free workshops, keynotes and closings throughout the day on state-of-the art methods in the teaching of reading and writing for grades K-8. Special guest speakers and literacy leaders from all over the country will join us to discuss such topics as: Help Students Think, Talk and Write Well About Reading, Teach Higher Level Comprehension; Use Assessment to Inform Instruction, and dozens and dozens more….

Katherine Paterson
The day will open with a keynote by Katherine Paterson, the author of young adult novels that have uplifted generations of children.  Her stories of perseverance in the face of impossible odds and her treatment of weighty topics, such as death and jealousy, have earned her numerous awards, including the National Book Award for The Great Gilly Hopkins, and the Newbery Medal for Bridge to Terabithia, and Jacob Have I Loved.

Speakers Include:

Lucy Calkins, Founding Director of the TCRWP is the author of many professional books including The Art of Teaching Reading, A Principals Guide to Leadership in the Teaching of Writing, and two series about units of study for primary and upper grade writing.  Her upcoming Units of Study on Teaching Reading for Grades 3-5 (Heinemann, 2009), co-authored with Kathleen Tolan, is due out from Heinemann soon.

Kathy Collins is the author of Growing Readers: Units of Study in the Primary Classroom. Kathy is a frequent guest lecturer at national conferences.  Her latest book is titled, Reading for Real: Teach Students to Read with Power, Intention and Joy in K-3 Classrooms.

Mary Ehrenworth is the author of Looking to Write: Children Writing Through the Visual Arts and The Power of Grammar: Unconventional Approaches to the Conventions of Language. Mary is the Deputy Director for Middle Schools at the TCRWP.

Amanda Hartman is Lead Coach at the Project and has co-authored three works with Lucy Calkins: Authors as Mentors, The Conferring Handbook and One-to-One: The Art of Conferring with Young Writers, as well as a CD-ROM: Conferring with Young Writers.

Laurie Pessah is Senior Deputy Director at the Project and leads study groups for principals, assistant principals, staff developers, and teachers, and she is co-author with Lucy Calkins of Nonfiction Writing: Procedures and Reports and A Principal’s Guide to Leadership in the Teaching of Writing.

Kathleen Tolan is Senior Deputy Director of Reading at the Project.  Kathleen co-wrote a FirstHand series on literacy coaching and co-authored with Lucy Calkins the upcoming Units of Study on Teaching Reading for Grades 3-5 (Heinemann, 2009).

Having found the “storytelling” behind history, our Closing speaker, Joy Hakim, author of the ten-volume series A History of US, will speak about shedding a new light on the teaching of history.  She put “the story” at the center of nonfiction again with her subsequent book, The Story of Science: Einstein Adds a New Dimension.  Her passion and style have brought her wide acclaim and recognition, and her awards include: The 2008 Benjamin Franklin Award for Education/Teaching/Academic, and the 2007 USA Book News’s Best Book in General Science Category.


The Morning Keynote will be held at Riverside Church9:00 a.m.

490 Riverside Drive (between 120th and 122nd Streets)

The remainder of workshops will be held at Teachers College, 525 W.120th Street, NY NY 10027

No registration required.

For more information, visit our Web site at: readingandwritingproject.com


 

Make My Day September 13, 2009

Sometimes I worry about Facebook.

Is it mentally healthy to be able to stay connected to your childhood friends especially when you live in your childhood town?

Do I really want everyone who is my Facebook friend to be able to read my blog when that is not the audience I intend it for?

All kinds of other silly worries… I know I shouldn’t worry, but…I am me.

But on the other hand I recently received a message from a friend that I haven’t seen nearly enough in the past year (names changed for privacy). That is a positive of Facebook!

Subject: good feedback…

“I’ve been wanting to share with you…  last week I was asking the girls what their favorite part of the first week of school was.  Sally said that your writing time was her favorite, as she proceeded to tell me all about three stories that she started writing (along with a story that you had shared with them).  I didn’t even have to coax her beyond recess!  Thanks for your dedication to all of our kids and their education!  We are so fortunate to have educators and friends like you!”

How much do I LOVE that!

Not that I was her favorite part of her first week of school, but that WRITING was her favorite part! Presentation and storytelling is so important in inspiring young writers! Getting to kick off writing workshop in multiple classroom over multiple weeks has been a blast! It doesn’t matter what the age, their stories are so great, and the ability for kids to learn quickly how to shape words to pull their reader in is darn amazing. I’ve gotten to hear/read during writing conferences with students about how the wind blows your hair back from your face as you go up the incline of a roller coaster and how to feels to pull back the string (so not the actual word) on the bow of your first deer hunt while your dad whispers in your ear and lets you take the first shot (I hate hunting but was able to marvel at his words.).

Pretty amazing. I love my job and I love that most every work day includes a happy, waist-high hug, and enthusiastic silent waves from students on their way from one part of the building to the next.

 

Launching Writing Workshop in Third Grade again, and again, and again… August 29, 2009

I haven’t been in an elementary school for the first week of school in eight years; I had forgotten what a magical time of year it is to be there! My first week of school for the past eight years has been in an intermediate school-grades four through six. I, of course, love the first week of school no matter where I am located, but there is just something indescribable about the aura younger children walk into to school with. Wide-eyed, ready to love anyone who is kind to them, elementary students radiate what schools should try to be all about-excitement over whatever lies just up ahead….

I advised a friend recently, when she worried about sending her youngest off to school next year-how hard that first day alone would be for her, to ask the principal to be a greeter at the school her oldest attend. Standing in a school hallway that first day (not having to worry about your first lesson or the growing pile of paperwork demanding attention on your desk), directing students the right way to a classroom, assisting a new student nervously trying to negotiate the building, is guaranteed to snap anyone (maybe not the Grinch, pre-Cindy Loo Who) into a happy place. Even if no student needs help, I know that just greeting familiar student faces after a summer away, is a happy thing.

We are trying to continue to grow our writing instruction and ourselves as teachers of writers. I know from personal experience, how nerve-wracking it can be for a teacher to jump with both feet into something new. While I think Lucy Calkins is absolutely brilliant, I believe the Units of Study for Teaching Writing books are a little hard to read and then process what they would look in your classroom. I still use them, recommend them, buy them, but I want to share a couple things I have learned about “using” them over the past years.

Let me tell you how it went for me the first time I tried one of the lessons from Units of Study for Teaching Writing, grades 3-6.

I read the lesson, and re-read the lesson and decided a little note card would help me remember all the key points I wanted to make sure I hit. After all, the first lesson in the book does span more than ten pages.

I did the connection. I told them what I was going to teach them. I demonstrated using my writing on chart paper what I wanted them to do.

I kept demonstrating.

My mini-lesson stretched out to 25 minutes. Realizing that I was out of time, I skipped the active engagement section, and sent them off to write.

For about six minutes.

I congratulated myself mentally on getting through the mini-lesson during those six minutes and got myself ready for the share portion of the lesson. I skipped the conferring part of the lesson.

I called them back to the gathering area and congratulated them on the work they had done as writers. Then I proceed to do a share-

letting every child share one thing (the only way I knew how to do a share) while watching the clock tick by for my read-aloud time.

Next day-

Had reviewed the lesson and my “cheat sheet” notecard. Realized that I hadn’t done the part of the lesson where I showed the students how an author had done what I was teaching them. Read the picture book aloud to them-highlighting the parts that illustrated my point. Realized that once again, the time was almost gone, sent them back to try it in their writing,

For about six minutes.

I think it took me three days to get through all the parts mentioned in the first lesson. Needless to say, my first unit of study lasted ten weeks instead of the suggested month.

You get the idea.

I didn’t realize that of all the things I was trying to do, the independent writing time and the conferring (that I usually skipped) was the most important part of all those lessons. I could see my students growing as writers in front of my eyes, but didn’t realize how much more they could have done if I had just stopped talking sooner and provided them with more time to work independently while I met with individuals and small groups to teach the writer, just what they needed. You don’t get much more differentiation than that!

I had known for years the power of individual reading conferences to help students grow as readers-I hadn’t realized that the same thing held true for helping students grow as writers.

So, if you are new to Calkins’ Units of Study, learn from my mistakes. No matter how long you think it will take to get through one lesson, discipline yourself to give the students writing time that grows in length as they grow in stamina that first week. Get through the first four mini-lessons in four days (or five if you really can’t bear it) and move on.

You’ll be glad you did…

 

Narrative Writing-Launching the Writing Workshop grades 3, 4, 5 August 19, 2009

Filed under: TCRWP,units of study,writing workshop — bestbookihavenotread @ 10:36 pm
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August & September  [Black # = Mini-lesson)

Materials=Units of Study for Teaching Writng grades 3-5; Book1-Launching the Writing Workshop = Launching; Book 2-Raising the Quality of Narrative Writing=Raising

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

On-demand Writing Piece (see prompt directions) 1 Mini-Lesson Starting the Writing Workshop-(session I Launching) 2

Mini-Lesson Generating More Writing- (session I or II, Launching)

3 Mini-Lesson Qualities of Good Writing-focus, detail, and structure (session III, Launching) 4; Mini-Lesson Nurturing/Rehearsing- The Writer’s Job in a Conference (session IV, Launching)

7 Mini-Lesson

Buidling Stories-Step by Step (session V, Launching)

8 Mini-Lesson –Choosing a Seed Idea (session VI, Launching) 9; Mini-Lesson-revising-

Studying and Creating Leads (session VII, Raising the Quality of Narrative Writing)

10; Mini-Lesson Writing Discovery Drafts (session VIII, Launching 11 ; Mini-Lesson Revising Developing the Heart of the Story (session XV, Launching)
14 Mini-Lesson

Revising Endings: Learning from Published Writing (session IX, Launching)

15 Mini-Lesson Taking Charge of Our Writing-Starting a Second Piece (session X, Launching) 16 Mini-Lesson Timelines and Tools for Planning and Developing Stories (session XI and XII, Launching) 17 Mini-Lesson Yesterday’s Revisons Become Today’s Standard Practice (session IV, Raising) 18 Mini-Lesson Ending Stories (session XII, Raising)
21 Mini-Lesson Using Editing Checklists (session XVI, Launching)

 

Architecture of a Mini-Lesson July 11, 2009

The architecture of a mini-lesson is a topic that came up several times over the past week at the Reading Institute , not as something taught to us, but as a topic that was taken for granted to be already understood. I remember when I was at TC in March for the Literacy Coach Institute and I had such an “ah-ha” (or maybe “duh” depending how you look it at) moment myself about the mini-lessons, so I am going to share it here.

The structure of all mini-lessons is the same. If you have read Units of Study for Teaching Writing, you already know that. I did already know that, when it came to writing, but I came to a different understanding of it in March. Not only are the parts of the mini-lesson the same for a writing lesson, but they are the same for everything the teach, whether it be a Unit of Study in Reading, a math lesson, or even something at home you are trying to teach/explain to your children (or even your husband-Don’t clue him in if you are!)

Connection-Remind them of what they’ve learned/been taught yesterday (or recently).

Do not make the mistake of asking, “Who can tell me what we learned yesterday?”. You don’t want cognitive dissonance-which often happens if a student volunteers a wrong answer and you keep calling on them until you get the answer you want.

Teach-Explicitly tell them what you are going to teach them and demonstrate what they are going to do on your own work or a shared text, such as the class read-aloud

Active Involvement (sometimes called Active Engagement)-You are scaffolding the children by providing an opportunity to do what you just modeled, either by themselves, or often with a partner (turn and try it). You want to vary the active engagement so it is not always stop & jot or turn & talk. Also try stop & think, stop & list, stop & act out, or any other that works for your students.

Link-link this to the ongoing work they’ve done and remind them how they should use/try what you taught them in their independent work

It is not just writing lessons, or just reading lessons, that can use this structure, it is all ways of teaching.

 

Lucy Calkins post May 3, 2009

Filed under: Calkins,units of study,writing workshop — bestbookihavenotread @ 7:01 am
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Angela Bunyi (What a fun last name!) has a great post over on her Scholastic Blog about the Heinemann Units of Study for Writing Workshop. Her fabulous husband surprised her with a present-a conference see Lucy Calkins in Memphsis (What a GREAT husband! I love him even though I don’t know him!).

She is a fourth grade teacher that uses Units of Study. She has also posted about the Essay unit, one that makes many teachers a little nervous. Check it out!

P.S.-This is one of the few blogs I can access from school and always has great information!

 

Shared Curricular Calendar for Units of Study in Writing April 27, 2009

Shared Curricular Calendar for Units of Study in Writing (Assuming use of Calkins’ Units of Study for Primary Writing and Units of Study for Teaching Writing Grades 3-5  as backbone)

First

September

Launching
the Writing Workshop

October

Small
Moments

November

Writing
for Readers

December

Authors as
Mentors

January

How To
Books

February

All About
Books

March

 

Independent
Writing Projects

April

 

Poetry

May

Realisitc
Fiction

 

Second

September

Narrative
Writing-Revisiting and Re-energizing Small Moments

October

Raising
the Level of Narrative Writing with Authors as Mentors

November

Writing
and Revising Realisitc Fiction

December

Fairy Tale
Adaptations and Original Fantasy Stories

January

Writing to
Grow Ideas (Including Ideas about Books)

February

Writing to
Learn and to Teach About a Topic of Personal Expertise

March

 

Persusaive
Writing (Letters and Reviews)

April

 

Poetry

May

Expert
Projects in a Content Area:

 

Third

September

Launching
a Productive Writing Workshop

October

Raising
the Quality of Narrative Writing

November

Writing
Informational Books with Authority and Voice

December

Fiction

January

Fiction

February

Revision
and OAT Writing

March

 

Return to
Nonfiction

April

 

Poetry

May

Independent
Writing Projects

 

 

 

 

 

Fourth

September

Launching
the Writing Workshop

October

Raising
the Level of Narrative Writing

November

Persuasive
Letter

December

Essay or
Writing to Make a Difference

January/February

Fiction

March

 

Writing to
Learn and to Teach About a Topic of Personal Expertise

April

 

Poetry

May

Persusaive
Writing Letters and Reviews)

 

 

 

Fifth           

September

Launching
the Writing Workshop

October

Raising
the Level of Narrative Writing

November

Personal
Essay

December

 Writing to Make a Difference

January

Fiction

February

Independent
Writing Project

March

 

Literary
Essay

April

 

Poetry

May

Memoir

 

 

 

 

Sixth

September

Launching
the Writing Workshop: Writing with Intensity, Determination, and Independence

October

Raising
the Level of Narrative Writing : Improving Volume and Quality

November

The
Personal Essay or Essay Study

December/Early
January

Short
Fiction

Late January/February

Quick
Writing, Writing About Reading, Preparaing for the Writing Tasks of the OAT

March

 

Choice
Project

April

 

Poetry

May

Memoir

 

 

 
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