Best Book I Have Not Read

Writing, Reading, Teaching, Life, Attempting to Balance it All

You’ll find me most of the time… August 28, 2012

Filed under: Africa,Dakar,International School of Dakar,Senegal — bestbookihavenotread @ 5:34 pm

Over at my new blog abroadinsenegal.wordpress.com

Come check it out. You’ll ever enjoy reading along with my adventure or think that I’ve lost my mind by giving up all things familiar for the next several years. You decide.

I’m still going to post BestBook posts that I think belong here, but my daily posting can be found over there.

 

Beginning of the Year Books recommended by The Book Whisperer August 21, 2012

Filed under: book reviews,school — bestbookihavenotread @ 6:25 am

If you haven’t had a chance to read Donalyn Miller’s column at Education Week, it is well worth a look! She’s gathered up several recommendations for ‘Books that Build Community’, something educators the world over are working on this first month of school.

 

What to Keep? What to Pitch? June 10, 2012

Filed under: school — bestbookihavenotread @ 1:16 pm
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A sample of what’s currently in my recycle box:

  • memoir rubric
  • using prior knowledge to understand unfamiliar text
  • 5 year Strategic Management Plan from 2010-2015
  • certificate of attendance from Ohio Resource Center
  • Ohio Academic content standards with notes
  • thank you note from Ronald McDonald House for former fourth grade economic project
  • Reading Level Correlation Chart

 A sample of what’s currently in my keep pile:

  • Elementary Gifted Service Matrix and Advanced Learner Specialist file
  • PD notes from Promoting a School’s Literacy Community
  • 32 Text Structure notes from Katie Wood Ray
  • Where You Are From George Ella Lyons poem
  • Suggested Expectations for conventions K-12 document
  • pacing guides
  • curriculum maps
  • a copy of the first day of school letter I sent home for all 15 years
  • a xerox copy of an amazing piece of student art work

Do I need any of it?

  • Will I remember what I want to use from what I’ve recycled or kept?
  •  Does it really matter to my remembering if I have “it” or not?

When I was a teacher I used to keep things in case I needed or wanted to replicate or modify something I had done in the past.

When I was a curriculum coordinator I kept things to show work in progress and keep us moving forward.

With a change in administrations twice in nine months, I kept things because no one else would have ever known things existed.

In many ways I am a blank slate, starting over. I bring with me my prior knowledge and background of experiences.

No one from my new school is going to ask me to see something from my old district because they won’t know it existed, nor would it be relevant.

Why am I re-sorting for the twentieth time, rather than just pitching it all?

It took me three years to part with all my fourth grade files, and I should learn from that. Never once did I go back and use anything in those files.

Part of my brain still thinks, “When I write a book about this….”, I will want hard copies of things to help with my writing.

I want to just dump it all as I look forward, but I still just can’t make myself do it…

 

Summer Reading set in Africa June 6, 2012

Filed under: summer reading — bestbookihavenotread @ 3:41 pm
Tags: ,

The Heaven Shop by Deborah Ellis
Chanda’s Secrets by Allan Stratton
Secrets in the Fire by Henning Mankell

20120606-164146.jpg

 

Summer Reading (or listening) June 5, 2012

Filed under: audiobook,summer reading — bestbookihavenotread @ 2:33 pm
Tags: ,

All you parents trying to figure out how to keep your kid reading, check out this summer’s free downloads at Sync. There is a popular new title and a classic each week all summer long. Some of them are right off the summer’s required reading list.

Schedule of SYNC Downloads

 

SYNC Titles
Summer 2012

June14 – June 20, 2012
The Eleventh Plague by Jeff Hirsch, Read by Dan Bittner (Scholastic Audiobooks)
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck, Frank Galati [Adapt.], Read by Shirley Knight, Jeffrey Donovan, and a Full Cast (L.A. Theatre Works)

June 21 – June 27, 2012
Irises
 by Francisco X. Stork, Read by Carrington MacDuffie (Listening Library)
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen, Read by Wanda McCaddon (Tantor Media)

June 28 – July 4, 2012
The Amulet of Samarkand by Jonathan Stroud, Read by Simon Jones
(Listening Library)
Tales from the Arabian Nights by Andrew Lang, Read by Toby Stephens
(Naxos AudioBooks)

July 5 – July 11, 2012
Anna Dressed in Blood by Kendare Blake, Read by August Ross (AudioGO)
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins, Read by Ian Holm (AudioGO)

July 12 – July 18, 2012
Guys Read: Funny Business by Jon Scieszka [Ed.] et al., Read by Michael Boatman, Kate DiCamillo, John Keating, Jon Scieszka, Bronson Pinchot (Harper Audio)
The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County and Other Stories by Mark Twain, Read by Norman Dietz (Recorded Books)

July 19 – July 25, 2012
Cleopatra’s Moon by Vicky Alvear Shecter, Read by Kirsten Potter (Oasis Audio)
Antony and Cleopatra by William Shakespeare, Read by a Full Cast (AudioGO)

July 26 – August 1, 2012
Pinned by Alfred C. Martino, Read by Mark Shanahan (Listen & Live Audio)
TBA (Brilliance Audio)

August 2 – August 8, 2012
Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor, Read by Khristine Hvam (Hachette Audio)
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, Read by Simon Prebble (Blackstone Audio)

August 9 – August 15, 2012
Skulduggery Pleasant by Derek Landy, Read by Rupert Degas (Harper Audio)
Dead Men Kill by L. Ron Hubbard, Read by Jennifer Aspen and a Full Cast
(Galaxy Press)

August 16 – August 22, 2012
The Whale Rider by Witi Ihimaera, Read by Jay Laga’aia (Bolinda Audio)
The Call of the Wild by Jack London, Read by William Roberts (Naxos AudioBooks)

 

ABroad in Senegal May 22, 2012

Filed under: Africa,Dakar,Senegal — bestbookihavenotread @ 5:09 pm
Tags: ,

Check out my new blog dedicated to all things about the move to Dakar:  ABroadinSenegal.wordpress.com

 

Association of International Schools of Africa

Filed under: Uncategorized — bestbookihavenotread @ 9:36 am

Who we are

Representing international schools on the continent of Africa, AISA has a membership of schools which range in size from 20 to 3600 students. AISA schools are strongly influenced by their location in Africa and their cosmopolitan student enrollment and teaching staffs who emanate from countries across the globe. Some AISA schools have an American based curriculum, others are British, and still others have an ecclectic mix. All have an international focus.

AISA’s Goal

AISA’s goal is, in collaboration with our Associate Members, to serve the varying needs of nearly 42,000 students and over 2,500 teachers and administrators.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Association is to facilitate school effectiveness and to inspire student learning in the international schools of Africa by promoting communication, collaboration, and professional development.

AISA Members Believe

  • All individuals have intrinsic worth and deserve an opportunity to learn in a challenging, safe, and nurturing environment
  • Optimal student learning is advanced through educational research and its application through effective practice
  • International education provides a foundation for global citizenship
  • Collaboration and interdependence among individuals and organizations are powerful agents of positive change
  • Appropriate use of technology maximizes student learning and school effectiveness

AISA’s Objectives

AISA will

  • Enhance the quality of student learning by promoting effective educational practice
  • Foster intercultural and international understanding
  • Promote an appreciation and understanding of Africa
  • Support professional development within member schools
  • Collect, analyze, and distribute information to help guide member schools
  • Enable close collaboration and networking among its members
  • Develop and maintain partnerships with organizations and institutions which complement AISA’s values and mission

 

 
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