Best Book I Have Not Read

Writing, Reading, Teaching, Life, Attempting to Balance it All

Writing Workshop Intermediate Grades August 30, 2008

 

 

Focus Lesson C2: Generating Ideas (sketching)

 

Purpose

This lesson begins to teach students how writers use their notebooks and helps them begin to gather ideas. It can be taught several times with different topics, books, authors, etc. so students have many opportunities to consider stories they may choose to tell (or write…soon).

 

Telling stories and listening to stories spoken and read aloud prepare students
to read and write narratives later in school. The standards expect students
to develop more and more detailed oral narratives—and more like written stories as they grow older.

 

Materials

  • book by Patricia Polacco (I would use the same one as yesterday so that you have already read it and don’t need to use that time for reading aloud)
  • Teacher and student writer’s notebooks
  • “Ideas to Write About” list

Other books you could  use: When I Was Young in the Mountainsby Cynthia Rylant, A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams

 

Intended Learning Statement

“As we continue with our Writer’s Workshop, we got ready to write yesterday by listening to a story of one of our favorite authors, listening to some of my stories, and working together as we listen and share our own stories. Today I am going to teach you another strategy for coming up with ideas to write about.

 

Whole Group Instruction

  • Modeling: Hold up yesterday’s picture book, think aloud by saying something, such as “Wow, Patricia Polacco’s story really helped me have a picture of where the story took place. Of course her wonderful illustrations painted the picture for me, but I could have closed my eyes and been able to imagine where the story took place…” then relate an interesting personal story about a place from your life where many of your personal stories could have taken place for students. As you talk through your place, sketch it on chart paper for students to see (mine was my grandparent’s house, yard, and neighborhood). Yours could have been your bedroom, your backyard as a child, the playground at your elementary, etc.  Share that there are many places you could have listed to pick from, but for today you selected the one that came to mind first. Explain how the place could be used to think of many different ideas for stories. Remember, you are not expected to be an artist-this is a sketch! Don’t be self-conscious.
    Be sure to think about your comments ahead of time.

 

  • Active Involvement: “Close your eyes and think about a place that  is important to you..” Allow actual “think” time. “Now turn to your partner and share your place.” Call on one or two students to orally share their stories and extend these stories with open-ended questions, such as “That’s interesting; tell me more about…”

 

Work Period

Say, “Today, I shared a sketch of a place that was important to me ________________  and we shared our own stories. While sharing, I hope you found at least one or several ideas about a place that is  important to  you that you might write about in the future. Before the end of our workshop time today, let’s sketch our place.”  Then students complete the sketch in their writer’s notebooks to make a picture. Sketching is added to the chart of “Ideas to Write About” list (see below). Allow students time to work on their first idea/story from yesterday or if they are finished start a story based on today’s sketch. Don’t allow anyone to say they are finished (CRITICAL). Encourage them to go back to yesterday’s list of people and write another story about that person or another story based on the sketch they drew.

 

During the work period, confer with several students (probably still in table groups). Also this might be a good day to teach them/reinforce the signal that you are going to use to get their attention if you need it during their writing work time.

   

Share Time

 

Ideas to Write About

·         Think of a person who matters to you, the list small moments you remember with him or her. Choose one to write the story that goes with it.

·         Sketch a place that is important to you and write one of the stories that took place there.

 


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·         Example: grandparent’s house/yard sketch

 

 Choose students to share some of their sketches, based on the writing conferences that took place during the work period (these are probably table group conferences still at this point in the year) . After sharing, ask, “What is something you learned as writers today?” Reinforce that the chart will be there for them to look at so there is no reason to not have something to write about during work time.

Note

Don’t forget that these are personal narratives. If a child starts going down the imaginary place/person path, try to redirect and explain that these are TRUE stories.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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