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Poetry Unit of Study Reading Lesson 5 Grade 5 April 3, 2010

Filed under: Poetry,reading workshop,units of study — bestbookihavenotread @ 5:32 am
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Reading Lesson 5: How to Read Poetry Aloud—Paying Attention to Line Breaks and White Space

Materials

• Poetry anthologies and copies of poems at a variety of reading levels for independent reading (see Reading Resources in Unit at a Glance)

• Student copies of three short poems they are not familiar with and one of the poems cut into word strips and arranged in pocket chart with wording in order, but different line breaks and white space

Intended Learning

Students hear and read poetry aloud to learn how line breaks and white space determine poems’ meanings, rhythms, and sounds.

Big Ideas

• Understand poetry elements, including word choice, rhythm, rhyme, imagery, metaphor, and visual design.

• Create mental images to understand literary language and deepen comprehension.

Mini-Lesson

Connection

Looking at the class chart “What Is Poetry?” point out how students already realize that white space and line breaks are essential poetry elements. Tell them line breaks and white spaces are as basic to poems as paragraphs are to prose. Discuss how many poems are arranged in lines and how poets decide on line lengths.

Today we look deeper at the power of line breaks and white space. Remind students what they learn today will help them become better poetry writers.

Teaching and Active Engagement

With the poem’s words in original order, direct students’ attention to the poem in the pocket chart. Ask volunteers to read the poem aloud, thinking of possible meaning and rhythms they hear. Then, with the poem’s words remaining in original order, ask for student input on rearranging the line breaks.

Ask volunteers to read the poem again with the new arrangement. Discuss how line breaks affect the poem’s meaning. Repeat the process with new line breaks, then read and discuss how the new line breaks affected the poem. Finally, show students the poet’s version of the poem and read aloud. Talk about how poets decide line lengths to influence meaning and sounds.

However, by using appropriate language-level poems and taking time learners to experience the effects of different poetry arrangements, this lesson can be very effective in developing the “ears” of budding poets and poetry readers.

Link

Students experiment with line breaks for at least one of the two other poems you chose. Direct them to first read the poem aloud, softly to themselves, to hear the poem’s sound and rhythm. Next, ask them to rewrite the poem with line breaks and white space that make sense to them.

Independent and Small Group Time

• Students read from poetry books and/or teacher-selected poems.

• Confer with individual students and/or provide small group instruction.

Sharing/Closure

• Group students who worked on the same poems in pairs or small groups.

• Ask them to show and read their poems and explain their thinking about the line breaks and white space.

 

Fifth Grade Poetry Unit of Study Writing Lesson 1 March 29, 2010

Filed under: Poetry,units of study,writing workshop — bestbookihavenotread @ 7:38 am
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Writing Lesson 1: Using the Writing Notebook-Collecting Interesting Words

Materials

• Poetry exemplars and anthologies used during Reading Workshop

• Students’ writing notebooks

• Teacher’s writing notebook

Intended Learning

• Students use poetry mentor texts and the world around them to record interesting and engaging words in their writing notebooks to develop a clearer sense of what it means to read and write like poets.

Big Ideas

• Develop awareness of sounds of words and rhythm of phrases.

Mini-Lesson

In her book, Poemcrazy, Susan Goldsmith Wooldridge stresses the importance of collecting words. She is always collecting words (“they’re free”) and writing them in her notebook.

Connection

Explain to students they are surrounded by words, good words, all the time. But unless we slow down and notice, we often miss them. Remind students that, in Reading Workshop, they have begun to notice the way poets use words and phrases to create imagery and emotion. The exercise today will help them as they begin to write poems.

Teaching

Tell students they are about to go on a word hunt. Their job is to look around the room and find interesting, engaging, intriguing words, or words they just like, and write them in their notebooks.

Model by reading three or four words recorded in your own notebook, such as “Yo!,” “wondrous,” “swiped,” or “pling.” Say each word slowly to “savor” the words’ sounds.

Ask students to look around the room for words they can see from their seats, on labels, posters, book covers, posted poems, and so on. Circulate around the room noticing students’ progress.

After a minute or two, ask a few students to share out. Again, enjoy the words’ rhythm and music.

Active Engagement

Give students three or four minutes to move around the room, looking for words and listening to the rhythmic or unique sounds of the words.

Tell students they are to write seven to 10 more words in their writing notebooks. Remind students they do not have to worry about the words’ meaning right now; they just need to pay attention to sounds, rhythms, and music of the words.

When students return to the group, have a few share out one or two of their interesting words. Choose students whose words reflect a variety of word choices, including nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, onomatopoeias, and so on.

Tell students today during independent writing time, they browse through some poems and poetry anthologies on their tables to find more words to add to lists in their writing notebooks. Students may already have poems in their book bags, depending on whether they have done the Reading Workshop Lesson 1: Poetry Pass -An Interview With Poetry .

Independent and Small Group Time

Students work independently or with partners to list possible words.

Sharing/Closure

• Students share with partners some words they found and wrote in their notebooks.

• Several students share out one or two of their favorites with the whole group.

• Close Writing Workshop by rereading one or two mentor poems, savoring—but not discussing—the language.

 

Fifth Grade Poetry UOS materials list March 28, 2010

Filed under: Poetry,units of study,writing workshop — bestbookihavenotread @ 7:25 pm
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  • Materials
  • Student copies of two poems, such as “Packing,” page 43, and “The Photo-graph,” page 19, in My Name Is Jorge: On Both Sides of the River by Jane Medina or other poems of your choice
  • Large variety of poetry books at different reading levels
  • Overhead and student copies of teacher-selected poem with strong concrete imagery, such as “Weeding With Dad,” page 52, in Baseball, Snakes, and Summer Squash by Donald Graves or “The Photograph,” page 19, in My Name Is Jorge: On Both Sides of the River by Jane Medina
  • Overhead and student copies of “Crafting Images” graphic organizer
  • Overhead and student copies of “October Saturday” from Lesson 12
  • More poems reflecting strong emotional element, such as “The Accident,” page 66, and “Giggling in Church,” page 70, in Baseball, Snakes, and Summer Squash: Poems About Growing Up by Donald Graves, “Rags” p. 13
  • Student copies of “Poetry Reflection” worksheet from The No-Nonsense Guide to Teaching Writing, pages 227-228, by Judy Davis and Sharon Hill, or your own reflection form (see end of this lesson)
  • pp. 159-160 The No-Nonsense Guide to Teaching Writing
  • Lesson D-8, “Using White Space in a Poem” from Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Overhead and student copies of notebook entries from Lesson D-8, “Using White Space in a Poem,” Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Lesson I-2, “Create a Poem from a Story,” from Teaching the Qualities of Writing by JoAnn Portalupi and Ralph Fletcher
  • I-3, L-6 from Teaching the Qualities of Writing by JoAnn Portalupi and Ralph Fletcher
  • Lesson D-14, “Use a Double Focus in a Poem,” from Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Student copies of “Grandpa’s Shoes,” from Lesson D-14, “Use a Double Focus in a Poem,” Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Lesson P–17, “Use Fragments When You Write a Poem,” from Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Student copies of “Hockey Practice at 5 a.m.” from Lesson P–17, “Use Fragments When You Write a Poem,” Teaching the Qualities of Writing by Ralph Fletcher and JoAnn Portalupi
  • Chart paper for shared writing poem
  • Source lesson: “Six-Room-Poem” from Awakening the Heart by Georgia Heard
  • Resource: Regie Routman’s Kids Poems
  • Mentor poems about personal experiences or mentor poets who have written about personal experiences or important things in their lives, such as “Autumn Thoughts” or “Aunt Sue’s Stories” in The Dream Keeper and Other Poems by Langston Hughes; or “Weeding With Dad,” page 52, or “Faking It,” page 75, in Baseball, Snakes, and Summer Squash: Poems About Growing Up by Donald Graves
  • Overhead of teacher-created poem about interesting or important topic
  • Chart paper to create “Where Poets Get Their Ideas” chart
 

Unit of Study Fiction Writing Grades 3-5 October 27, 2009

Here are my notes from my first session at TCRWP Reunion Weekend. The presenter was a dynamo!

Writing- Short Fiction

Quick Look at Writing Process:

  • Generating (3-4 days)
  • Choosing (1 day)
  • Developing (5-6 days)
  • Drafting (1-2 days)
  • Revising (3 days)
  • Editing (2 days)
  • Publishing (1 day)

 

Generating (3 days; 4 if not enough blurbs to choose from Writing Story Blurbs-what the story could be about (do for 3-4 days)

  • Chart: Writers Generate Ideas By:
    • Paying attention to the issues (problems) in their lives –don’t let them pick too big of an idea
    • Imaging stories we wish existed in the world
    • Rereading their narrative entries in their writers notebooks and asking themselves, “How could I turn this into a different story?”
      • be very focused-specific-don’t pick whole story (example-playground)
        • 3rd grade-friendship-what happens at recess, can relate to through many times
        • Stories should match their age!!

3-4 days of Story Blurb Writing-We are filling up our notebooks!

Don’t worry about spelling and grammar at this point

Immediately draw a line and have 10-12 pieces (story blurbs) to choose from

  • Story Blurb examples:
  • Maybe I could write about these two girls competing…
  • Maybe I could write about a boy who goes to summer camp…
  • I wish I could read a story about a boy named Josh…

Writers, you are always saying there are no good stories to read in the library and…

  • Somebody…Wanted…But…So

          Pushes them to develop problem

Somebody Wanted (Feared, cared) Because But/so
Jade Cared about her dog Scruffy Because Scruffy was very special to her Her dog ran away and didn’t come back
Bill Wanted to find out why his mom was going out at night Because his mom had just gotten divorced He followed her and found out she was dating

Pick one from chart and stretch out into a story blurb

Mentor Text-Those Shoes

          Not “perfect” ending

          Not she wanted a dog so her mom bought her a dog

  • Choosing (1 day to select)
  • Developing/Nurturing/Rehearsal-need to spend more time on this so 1 day on story mountains or timelines 
  • Drafting
  • Revising
    • Dictionary definition-
      • to prepare a newly edited version (of a text)
      • to reconsider and change or modify-put on a different set of lenses
      • Editing
      • Publishing (1 day)
Possible Teaching Points for Generating with some Predictable problems and strategies

  • Trouble Coming Up with a Story Idea
  • Story Doesn’t Match the Genre
  • Students writing stories about themselves
  • Students Do Not Understand the Problem Arc

 

  • Trouble Coming Up with a Story Idea

                    Bring in mentor texts—that you could take and change-example Those Shoes

                   If you were reading this book what would you say about it? Is it interesting. Would you tell me what isn’t interesting. Let’s make something happen! Make idea stronger and working with it.

  • Story Doesn’t Match the Genre (flying, ghosts-we will do fantasy later in the year)
    • Ask Yourself, “Can it happen to you?” no superhero magic endings
  • Students writing stories about themselves

          How Can we tweak this?
                   Maybe different problem

                   Never say, “bad idea”-say “great idea-Let’s try tweaking it.”

  • Students Do Not Understand the problem arc-they solve the story immediately
Possible Teaching Points for Developing with some Predictable problems and strategies

  • Choosing a story they think is strong enough, one they want to work on and one they think they can write well
    • Which one do you want to work on and which one do you think they can write really well.
    • Writers can develop their internal and external traits and not holding on to the problem in the story—

 

  • Choosing a story they think is strong enough, one they want to work on and one they think they can write well
    • Which one do you want to work on and which one do you think they can write really well.
    • Writers can develop their internal and external traits and not holding on to the problem in the story—
Struggle Problem Internal (limit the #) External
He wants to be popular so he lies and says he cheated when he didn’t Bob has let his friend cheat from his test. He gets caught because teacher thinks
  • Usually honest
  • Good student
  • Smart
  • lonely
medium heightbrown hair

only child

freckles

  • Think about problem first
  • Shy girl problem-wouldn’t be super friendly and loud
  • 3rd Grade-booklets
    • Storytelling using story booklets-touch page and say aloud-do at least twice each
  • 4th/5th Grade
    • Creating story mountains with small actions
    • Breaking down their story mountains into smaller scenes by thinking about:
      •  change of setting
      • change of time
      • when new characters enter or leave the scene

Sketching our scene

  • Use a sentence strip
    • Rules: have to show time of day by including a clock or night/day
  • Bigger scenes-more happens
  • Smaller scenes-make boxes reflect that
  • Notebooks away-no looking during sketching the story
           
1 2 3 4 5 6

Story Mountain example- Illustrate how to put—Boxes around scene

On Choosing Day:

  • have them bring notebook and put a little star next to which one they think is strong enough
  • thumbs-up when you have your idea
  • give post-it note to thumbs-up and quickly see/assess ideas
  • 10-20 minutes on rug to choose
  • Let strugglers take notebook home the night before to pre-pick
Predictable Problems During Choosing/Developing

  • 1 dimensional characters
  • Story doesn’t have a clear plot
  • Struggling with creating a scene
  • The solution is without struggle
  • There is no tension building up

 

  • 1 dimensional characters
    • Really evil or really nice
  • Story doesn’t have a clear plot (story doesn’t make sense)
    • Bring them back to Somebody, wanted, but, so
  • Struggling with creating a scene (what could happen before she got what she wanted)
  • The solution is without struggle
  • There is no tension building up
    • Teach how to slow scene down
      • Add: show don’t tell
        • Show internal thinking
        • Add action or dialogue

ALL BEFORE DRAFTING!!!

What does drafting look like:

          Big scene-full sheet of paper

          Small scene-half sheet of paper

 

Writing Informational Books with Third Graders-A Unit of Study in Writing August 12, 2009

I went to a great closing session today about Writing Informational Books with Third Graders and took TONS of notes. It is billed as a third grade unit, but in Ohio essays aren’t introduced until fifth grade, so I was thinking for some schools (mine included), this could be a good expository unit for fourth graders.

  • a unit of study to be done in November of third grade rather than the essay unit for fourth and fifth grade. A type of expository writing that prepares them for that future work.
  • unit will be 3-4 weeks long
  • start reading informational books aloud several weeks before starting the unit

Goals to keep in mind:

1. volume-a page a day-not just a few words, but full sentences. Remember where they were in 2nd grade with their All About Books

These will be topics that they are mini-experts in (example-skateboarding, baby sisters, etc.). Research will be light. They will know about their topic and have personal experience with it.

There will be chapters with full pages

2. revision-when we do revision it’s large scale revision-how do I add on a lot more information or how do I change how this chapter looks

3. structure-What is the structure and how will I organize the chapters?

example-if their topic is giraffes and a chapter is about the food they eat, will it be organized by what they eat morning, noon, and night, or will it be a compare/contrast-how what giraffes eat is similar to a horse diet; how it is different from a horse diet.

clear topic with examples-example-is your sock draw a jumbled mess or is it organized so other people would be able to find something in it

4. Writing to Teach-not just writers, but teachers-write with a teaching voice

try to anticipate readers’ questions

have text features in non-fiction that they can use (visual aids)

There are 2 options for how this unit can go:

1. Multiple Informational books (on multiple topics) kept in a writing folder-if your students stamina and volume is low they might benefit from writing one, then going on to another. Then when there are mini-lessons, they can try out the strategies on any of those “finished” books

2. Write 1 books for the whole unit-do more work around revision and see different ideas they can draw out

1 page= 1 chapter

Possible Layout for Informational Book Study

Launch

Rally students to the big work of the whole unit, “You are already writers, now you will become teachers!”

Collect (this will be a couple days) Try different topics on for size

  • writers ask “What do I think people are dying to know?”
  1. -think of things you are good at
  2. -think of a person, place, or  thing and information you know about those things (ex-making bed, getting backpack ready, fighting with sibling, soccer, practicing the piano, walking the dog, taking out the trash)
  3. -think about things you care about (ex-people, recycling)
  4. -reread your true stories to get ideas of things they know a lot about (friends-fighting/apologizing, how to make one, types of friends, what do you do in a fight with a friend
  5. -talk to family and friends to tell you what you are good at
  • We make categories of informational and chapters that go with topics
  1. -make lists, webs, or other graphic organizers to think through topics
  2. -in partnerships or small groups, rehearse chapters by taking on a posture of a teacher teaching a course.
  • angle topics towards ideas (this allows for differentiating/making more challenging)

example-dog:

  1. feeding
  2. grooming
  3. parts of a dog

versus more idea based:

Dogs are Man’s Best Friend-

  1. Dogs help you (example-dogs help policemen, firemen, shepherds)
  2. Dogs protect you (example-dogs protect the house, people, etc.)
  3. Dogs play with you (example-dogs chase you, play tricks, etc.)

Gather Information

  • grow ideas about this topic in notebook and then teach
  • decide how you want your informational book to go
  1. parts of-
  2. kinds of-
  3. reasons of-
  4. examples of-
  • create a few chapters
  • gather information (probably should be in separate folders-not in notebook)
  1. information
  2. ideas
  3. personal experiences/illustrative anecdotes
  4. observations
  5. surveys
  6. interviews
  7. notes from books

asthma example-

  1. What is asthma?
  2. How does asthma feel?
  3. What does an asthma attack look like?
  4. Stories of people with asthma
  • Elaborate on information by reusing the notebook
  • use conversational prompts to capture ideas on information
  1. compare-it’s kind of like…
  2. contrast-it’s not like…
  3. find importance/significance of something-this is important because…
  4. question-This makes me wonder…
  5. react-The surprising thing about this is…
  • Reorganize or rename chapters if needed. We push ourselves to organize the information in a logical sequence, asking ourselves, what might the reader need to know first? second? and so on…

Drafting

loose leaf paper

start drafting out paragraphs with topic sentences and information from folder examples/details

  • read all of our notes and information and decide how the information in this chapter will be organized . Can choose paper type that matches vision (paper can be temporary scaffold with as much or as little support as needed for each student)
  • make sure information goes with chapter heading
  • study words or phrases informational book authors use so we can add them to our writing. Words like “most”, “some”, “for example”
  • elaborate on facts by using partner sentences (definitions and examples-example-Fish have gills. Gills are the slits on the side of the fish’s body that allow it to breath. OR Fish breath through gills. The gills open and close like blinds on a window.)

Revise

  • write detailed descriptions of objects in ways readers can picture it (baseball-not just word, red stitching, words, etc-precise words, colors, textures)
  • determine importance and pump up the parts that are important
  • clarify for the readers information/questions readers might have
  • increase believability-don’t exaggerate
  • try something from a mentor text-text features: pictures with captions, charts, diagrams, glossaries, headings)
  • look at informational in the chapter and ask, “Is this logical?, “Is this in order?”

Edit

  • edit for clarity
  • make important vocabulary and terminology stand out with bold, italics, or underlined
  • teach conjunction words, colons, commas, or other structures student writers will encounter

Publish